Nailed it

84 Lumber forks over $15M for Super Bowl LI spot

There's gonna be a new player in the field of Super Bowl LI this year — and it's from Pittsburgh.

Biz publication AdWeek reports 84 Lumber is spending $15 million on a 90-second commercial — the only brand to buy more than a minute of air time for a single spot.

The spot is scheduled to air right before halftime.

For its commercial, 84 Lumber will go through Pittsburgh-based ad agency Brunner. It will be the first ad by a Pittsburgh-based agency in decades.

AdWeek cites several sources in reporting the rate for a 30-second spot is $5 million-plus.

In all of 2015, 84 Lumber spent only $736,000 in domestic marketing, according to Kantar Media.

The ad will highlight a yearlong campaign by 84 Lumber to recruit workers — specifically, men ages 20 to 29 — seeking long-term jobs rather than contract jobs.

"Our industry is going through a period of extreme disruption," said owner and president Maggie Hardy Magerko in a statement. "And I've always preferred to be the one doing the disrupting, rather than the one being disrupted. But to do that, we need to hire and train people differently. We need to cast a wider net, and to let the world know that 84 Lumber is a place for people who don't always fit nicely into a box."

As for the company, this from AdWeek:

84 may be new to the national advertising scene, but it includes some 250 locations across 30 states and made Forbes' 2016 list of "Largest Private Companies in America." It is also one of the biggest such businesses run by a woman; Hardy Magerko was chosen by her father at the age of 27 to lead the company he founded in 1956.

Other new companies buying Super Bowl ads for the first time: Febreze, Mr. Clean and GNC.

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